Two Black Girls Talk About Everything

Episode 4: Black Lives Rising with Lola Small

January 31, 2021 Dianne Bondy Yoga and Yogi Dee Season 1 Episode 4
Two Black Girls Talk About Everything
Episode 4: Black Lives Rising with Lola Small
Show Notes Transcript

This episode not only talks about the importance of the movement Black Lives Matter but the next steps in creating opportunities and platforms for Black Lives to rise. Dianne and Dee talk to creator and founder of Black Lives Rising on her vision for the future of equity. 

Speaker 1:

Anti-racist work is an act of love. You know, we, we do this and whatever way we can, however way we're doing it. Because, because we love those who are affected . We love our humanity and we love the work that we do.

Speaker 2:

Two black girls talk about everything, podcasts , I'm Diane and [inaudible] . And we're going to be talking about every deal , talking about yoga and fashion and just everything I'm talk about in this episode, you'll be talking to the founder and creator of black lives, rising Lola small, Lola will talk to us about the importance of creating powerful platforms that help elevate the lives and the voices of black people. Lola is a Taiwanese Canadian women's empowerment coach, international best selling author and a social activist. She has over 20 years of combined experience in teacher training, curriculum, design, mind, body fitness, education, athletic event management and empowerment coaching. She is the founder of a new platform called black wives rising to provide resources and support for the black community, especially for emerging leaders, black parents, and mixed families. Welcome to the podcast.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much. Yes, that is me. Thank you for the intro.

Speaker 2:

We're so excited to have you over.

Speaker 3:

We are, we are, we wanted to talk to you because , um, we know since June of may or June of 2020, when we all saw George Floyd die in real time, that black lives matter has taken on a new kind of elevation. I've said this a lot on a lot of podcasts I've spoken on and in public that prior to George Floyd dying, when I used to put black lives matter up on my Instagram page, I would have thousands of people just unfollow me. I've had arguments online with people that black lives matter is a terrorist organization. I run the gamut with black lives matter people's reaction to it. And then we saw a quick pivot , um , in the spring where we saw police brutality up close and in real time. And then all of a sudden black lives matters was trending. And I was getting tens of thousands of new followers all the time and people were sharing their platforms and there was a , um , raising people's voices. And I was taking over prominent , uh, uh, Instagrammers platforms and, you know, sharing my life because people wanted to elevate it, elevate black voices. And then that was on the surge for awhile . And I knew it was going to level off and then it kind of leveled off and then people lost interest. Black lives matter , stopped trending. And I think I've read some statistics somewhere. I'll try to look them up and post them in the show notes that, you know, we've had a big drop in the support for black lives matter. Now in the Americans have a brand new administration who has actually named systemic racism and is re trembling really hard to push back or fight back against it with new policies with this new administration. And I kind of feel like there's going to be a lot more pushback, kind of with the rise of Trumpism and all those things. So I remember talking to you about the importance of black lives matter, and you saying something really key to me that just sticks in my mind. Every time I see black lives rising black lives matter, you said is the minimum we can do. That's what you told me is the minimum we can do. So tell me, what is your, your vision for black lives rising? Tell me what inspired it and what's your vision going forward? I know that's a big question.

Speaker 1:

Well, it's perfect because , um, you know, it's exactly what it is. It's, it's a very big mountain that we are climbing. Uh, and I think the word that you said at the beginning was perfect elevation elevation, you know, for me , uh, for just a little bit of a background info I'm Asian and my husband is black. And so then of course, our four year old son , uh, even at his age, knows that he's, Blasian, that he's a mix of both. And, you know, when all the events happened last summer, it was of course a no brainer that we had to participate. You know, we were here raising a future leader. That of course is very relevant to our family. So when we went to a couple of the marches here in Hamilton and as well, you know, in Windsor as well, it just didn't make sense to me that I had to defend or prove that my husband and my son was just as worthy as your husband and your son, like, does that not sound absurd that any person with any sort of IQ would of course cognitively know yes. That that's of course true that a black person's life matter, even those who oppress black people know that fact. But , um, so really for me, the way I see it as well, I, I don't, I'm not here to argue with you that they matter, you know, they matter the only thing I can control, I can not control how people treat my son or my husband, but I can control how I help them to rise to their best so they can go out and claim what's theirs. Wow. And the way I see it, you know, the , the , the word critical mass kept coming to me because, you know, we have this little Seesaw right now where obviously our current world and our current system is all, you know, white centered, right? So the only way for us to pivot and shift that Seesaw is will we have a critical mass, big enough rising on this side while we do the deconstructing and the dismantling, you know, those things have to happen at the same time. So for me, I choose to be on this side where I'm helping the rising and for those who feel called to dismantle and destroy and just deconstruct so that we can rebuild, we then get to meet in the middle and create something new and beautiful and better for every person involved. That's kind of , I love that. I love that,

Speaker 3:

But I just think it's a brilliant concept, a brilliant concept, and that idea of critical mass. I like the analogy that you make that example of being on a Seesaw , um , that right now it's really heavy with that white centered world and that we need to build up the other side. So we, we run into the , into the middle and I'm just hoping against all hopes that the momentum around black lives matter. Doesn't bottom out all together. And that we grow, we grow bigger momentum around black lives rising because what I saw with , um , the world as it's evolving is the rise of hate groups, right? There's a lot of pushback, I think because there's a lot of fear , uh, within white communities. And I, and just, this is just an observation. Um, honestly, this is my thought that because we've been oppressed as a people for so long BiPAP, black indigenous people of color , um, have been oppressed for so long that as the demographics in the world start shifting. And when, I mean the world, I mostly mean North America because in the world, people of color hold the majority of the population, but in North America currently right now, white holds majority of the population. Why , which is why everything is always so white centered and colonization and the genocide of indigenous people. And we, we all know the history, right? So I feel like as the population is beginning to shift, and I believe it's either 20, 40, or 2050 people of color will represent the majority of the population. So I feel this rise in white supremacist groups and this rise and vitriol and hate is a direct , um , reaction to that idea that they may lose power or that people who have been oppressed by white supremacy , um, will now act the way our pressors have acted towards us. So the oppressed will become the oppressor. There's this weird idea that that's going to happen. And as far as I can tell, and I I've been to all the meetings , that's my joke. Uh, black folks and people of color are not interested in impressing white folks at all. We're interested in the same opportunities and the same access to opportunities as white folks have currently. And we want to acknowledge our contributions to the history and to the building of this country. And that's all we're asking for. And I don't know why that is so hard for the dominant culture to

Speaker 1:

Understand. Yeah. I mean , I think, you know, the, this idea of , um, you know, the fear behind the, Oh my gosh, well, if this group rises and that would mean that's less for us, well, it's not that kind of pie, you know, like the abundance of this universe, there is more than enough for everybody. So I think that's, you know , um, and this is just not just a race thing is it also is in the concept of money is in the concept of, you know, worth and respect and love that there is more than enough. So, you know , race is just one , um, representation of it. So, yeah, I mean, I, you know, I get really tired of trying to defend and teach and be like, you know, and, and teaching them the things that it's just a fact of life in the universe. So I rather conserve my energy and pour it all into how I can empower my son to be the person who will create the world that we want to see. Absolutely. So how are you explaining these things to your son? Like you were saying, you guys were going out to marches and I know seeing on your social media, you guys, you know, supporting this cause what is the conversation? I love that question because I think that's another really important point when it comes to critical mass is that most people think, Oh my gosh, we live in Canada. You know, it has nothing to do with us. Oh, well, I'm not black. I don't have black people in my family. So like, what am I supposed to do? People, you know, some people are more invested than other people, but yet it, it influences all of us. So all of us have our own peace and our own contribution to this whole picture. So for me, and those with kids are our kids, especially this generation there's , they're , they're amazing beyond words, you know, they are a wise in a way that we, we don't even know. So with all this stuff happening, there is a way to sit, to kind of talk to them about it in a way they understand, right? Because it comes down to the very basic concepts of fear and hate and respect and love and all those basic human emotions. So we do our best to, you know, to include him in the conversation, using language and examples that he understands and include him in , um, activities. Definitely the marches, you know, the things that we are able to find on YouTube or Netflix, there are so many resources. Now books of course, are a huge resource. Um, because he is the answer, you know, he is part of the solution. So it's, it would be silly to not include them even at age four. So , um, I mean, I, hopefully through this conversation, whoever's listening for those who have kids, regardless of what age, and regardless of what race you are, you have a part and you can something in , in this grand scheme of things.

Speaker 3:

And D I, my , I guess my question also is four years ago, when you had your son, was this something that you thought would be a fight? That would be a thing,

Speaker 1:

Oh my God, no. I mean, it's crazy, you know, it , there's so many layers to this question in this answer, you know, I mean, I've had people ask me like, Oh my God. So how do your parents feel about you marrying a black man, you know, conversations like that. So, you know, you know, that it was, it was going to be a thing at some point , uh, obviously never would. I have imagined that all of a sudden, I mean, my life's work has been on girls empowerment and women's empowerment, but last year, this year, I'm now shifting and pivoting and pivoting like everybody else to now this being my, my main work, cause I cannot think of a better legacy for me to leave than to do work that will directly benefit my , my child and my husband. Of course, he gets a little jealous because I always talk about just our son, but of course it's for him, you know? Um, I read somewhere that was so good. Anti-racist work is an act of love. You know, we, we do this and whatever we can, however we were doing it because, because we love those who are affected . We love our humanity and we love the world that we live in. So we do what we can to try to elevate that.

Speaker 3:

I love that because , um, I recently, I spent a lot of time on social media and I recently saw , um, an infographic. I think if you scroll through my feed of , uh , the wellness community, we know that the wellness community is very white centered. Um, a lot of white women wellness stuff going on out there and somebody had re-imagined the wellness community to involve activism and anti-racist work. Um, so just to clarify, anti-racist work is when you actually are doing something to dismantle racism non-racist is like, well, I've never said the N word and my family never owned slaves and Oh, well, you know, it's very, there's no action behind it. And I feel like the intention is I'm going to put in quotes well-meaning but not engaged, whereas anti-racism work as I'm going out there and doing something to change the state of the world and to, to actively deconstruct something, not saying the N word and, you know, ignoring and not seeing color and pretending to be an ally that way, or being performative in your allyship. I think aligns more with non racist ideology as opposed to anti racist ideology. And I love the comedian it's social commentary, pop culture critic, Amanda seals . Um, I be knowing she's got a book called IB knowing, and she , um, she makes an analogy. There are people out in the world who are white people. And then there are people in the world who happened to be white. And the people in the world who happened to be white, understand the humanity of people who are also BiPAP people who are white, have no kind of self-awareness around where they are on the social structure and how they continue to contribute to the oppression of marginalized groups. And I think that's , that's very interesting. Another thing I kind of wanted to touch on that came up a lot for me is the idea of anti-blackness in the Asian community. And I follow a lot of Asian creators on Tik TOK and South Asian creators because anti-black anti black racism happens globally. And I cannot figure out what we did as a people that would make the world hate us, all of us , um, because of the amount of melanin, our Malana sites in our skin make. And so what has been your reaction because you did touch on this with, Oh, how do your family feel about you marrying a black man? How does, how does that, like, what is your interaction or experience with anti-black racism, racism within the Asian community?

Speaker 1:

It's so interesting. Cause , um, you know, I, I was born in Taiwan, my family and I moved to Oregon when I was 11. So Oregon is , uh , you know, as a pretty white state, not very diverse. Um, and then , uh, so that was my first exposure to white people. Cause you know, growing up in Taiwan, all I've seen is Taiwanese people. Um, and then my family and I moved to South Carolina when I was 13 and that was my first exposure to black people. So you can imagine kind of, you know, as a child going from like, this is all I know to now all of a sudden that expanding and then expanding and then there's a big reckoning that has to happen. Right. And then it's kind of like, okay, what am I knowing about all of this? My answer to your question is it's all media, right? It's all media meaning before I met about black person, I had no idea. Like I had no clue anything about what a black person , whatever, all the connotations that came with that. I remember a boy, his name was Michael and he's black and him saying to me, well, you go back to where you're from. And I'm like, I didn't know what to say. So the only thing I knew how to say was, well, then you go back to where you're from, you know? And like, what does that even mean? Most Asian people in Asia, all they know about black people and black culture is from television, for movies, from music, from the mainstream, pop, everything. So whatever is portrayed in like the dominant media is what their understanding of Asian of, of black people are. So just like if here in North America, you know, you're , you're , that's the exposure you're getting. So of course you're going to have the same , um, attitudes and kind of discriminatory views on what you're seeing. So in all of this change, the media has to change. It plays such a huge role because it's what we now globally, especially with social media on our phones, that's the that's , those are the things that people were observing .

Speaker 3:

I had a very similar experience as you Lola. Um, I , I also grew up , um, my, my mother is Portuguese and my dad is African Canadian. And I remember getting to a certain age and not really knowing the difference, like not knowing anything, just, I guess in my head, I thought I have one parent that, you know, when I look back, one was one shade, one with the other. And I just thought every child had had parents like that. And I remember a boy at school seeing my dad, my dad dropped me off seeing my dad and he saying your dad's black. And I was like, yes. So, but walking away and thinking, what , what does that even mean? Right. And it's , it's the coming to that. Um, just that realization that, you know , I was just gonna say that that's your, that's your own point of reference? And I think it's really important to, you know, highlight how much the media has shaped, what we believe about each other, right? Because the Asian stereotype is the model minority. They're smart, they're hardworking , they're great at math, not lazy. And it's just the stereotype. If you've never interacted with an Asian person before, that is what you would believe because that's what the media portraying . And on the flip side of that, you know, the , the African-American the Canadian American, the Caribbean, the black stereotype is like, well, they're lazy and they're on welfare and they're not very smart. And as a black little black girl growing up in a very white community, I mean, my brother , sister and I were the only black kids in our grade school. And I think until about the seventh grade, then when , um, other schools that only went up to the sixth grade, we had other kids bused in. And that was the first time I was exposed to other black people in my class. And that's so hard because all of your identity is fed to you by the media. And the media is the majority of the stories that are being told about people who are marginalized or are part of the BiPAP community. All those stories are told by white folks at this point, for the most part, I would say it's only been in the past 10 years or maybe 20 years even, or maybe even 30 years, even that we've had influence where black creators get to tell our stories that black people get to tell their own stories and Asian people get to tell their own stories. I wouldn't even, I look at the Asian community. I , um, I went and saw the movie crazy rich Asians. And prior to seeing that movie, the movie before that, that I can remember that was so focused on Asian culture would have been , um, the cartoon variation of long , which was maybe 20 years prior to that. And then the joy luck club. And then , um, is it hidden driving crouching tiger? Like, I mean, for Asian movies, some of them, you know, in mythologies , some of them kind of true stories, like join that club . But before that, what exposure would I have had to Asian people, only the stereotype. And for the most part, the stereo, I find the stereotype of Asian people by white culture tends to be positive. Like the, you know, the model minority, look at them, they've managed to pull themselves up by their bootstraps, why can't black folks and black folks stop being valuable to white folks after slavery. And they were no longer interested in our health outcomes. They were no longer interested in equality. And they're always telling black folks to pull yourself up from the bootstraps when they're holding the boots, right. You have to have boots to pull yourself up. And I think it's really unfortunate that people don't understand that, right? Like the playing field hasn't been level for a long time. You've had hundreds of years of a headstart . So if we have to have policies in place, if we have to have a hiring policies in place, as part of that pivot, you said as part of the Seesaw in creating that equality, we have to like load the other side to bring it to even, and if your feelings are hurt that , um, people of color or black folks are getting what you deem a leg up, or what you deem taking your space, then you're buying into white supremacy. The white supremacist aspect of that is that you think you have a space that's being taken from you. I think that's the delusion of white supremacy.

Speaker 1:

Yes. And, you know, with black history month being

Speaker 3:

Next right now , right now , um, you know,

Speaker 1:

Yes, we need to know the history we need to, we need to learn, you know, what's happened up to this point, but I mean, we've been doing black history for a long time, right? I mean, mainstream media and internet and all the stuff in schools, whatever has been doing black history month for many months now. It's okay. Yes, let's learn. But now let's create new history. I'm interested in creating new history. Every person right now has the choice to be in the right side of history and create something new. So,

Speaker 3:

You know, I, I really

Speaker 1:

Hope to see more of the conversation and more of the actions being focused on this side of the curtain

Speaker 3:

Agreed it's time, it's time. And we always tell a black history from the, from the place of , um , slavery, right. Or enslavement, that's where black history starts in North America for a lot of people. And I would really love to know , um, who we were prior to that. And we don't have that. Right. We don't get to learn who we were prior to that, because that's the stories that everybody always wants to tell. And I find it very hard living here in Canada to get a clear vision of what black history looks like and our place in culture, because in Canada, we don't really talk about black history. I think I've learned more , um, about the roots of, of black history from Dee and her telling her stories. And I mean, she, you worked at the black history museum from high school, so you had to learn it yourself as well. We don't teach it in school as a platform or as a positive place to pivot to the other side of the curtain that we were powerful people before. And we can draw on that power. We created so many wonderful things. We contributed to so many, so much to this country that we don't get to learn about. And I think if you have that , um, understanding of how powerful you are, as opposed to like you you're this you're that or whatever the stereotype is, I think it gives you more of a springboard to do bigger things on the other side of that curtain

Speaker 1:

And, you know, growing it's funny, cause growing up in , in, in Oregon, in the States, I remember there's a lot of, kind of, you know, not a lot, but you hear multiculturalism and, and that, you know, here and there, and I think for the current education system, the fact that it's so white , um, the current, not even education system like institutionally, but like in the, within the families and on an individual level, you know, white culture, white people, white, everything needs more missile learn more real self-love because when you can do that and when you can, you can have that. You can then really appreciate what multiculturalism has to bring, right? You can, you can really respect and really, truly believe that multiculturalism is beautiful until you've learned to accept that I am I too, am beautiful and worth loving. Then you can love all these others are different from you on the outside, but on the inside we're skins and bones and heart and brain and fear and love. We're all the same. S H I T if I may say that on here,

Speaker 3:

We'll just put down what makes this cool,

Speaker 1:

All like, we're all like, I don't know how many different ways we can say this, but we're all the same on the insight and the quicker we can realize that the quicker we can get to constructive things that's right. That's right.

Speaker 3:

It has been such a struggle , um, to constantly be educating people about our shared humanity. And I'm hoping in the future , um, I'm hoping this next generation that because they're growing up in a much more , um, they're I say it multicultural landscape , uh, that they can move beyond that, that they can see the similarities in each other and the empathy they can empathize with each other. Um, Nathan, my son. And if you're looking at all of the black lives rising like means and stuff, my ours , our kids are in it. Um, if you didn't figure out Lola's my sister-in-law. Um, but , uh, I, my son had a media arts project and he, him and his best friend , uh, Dante, who is Italian and French did a podcast that was their , their media arts project. And they called it the mediocre PR podcast , which I thought was hilarious. And they interviewed like five people for the podcast. And they interviewed me around what black lives matter versus all lives matter versus blue lives matter. You know, what is structural racism look like all the questions and Nathan's best friend Dante was really engaged in this conversation. And he interviewed me and he came with a list of really well thought out questions for a 15 year old. And he even said, I've been to the mall with Nathan. And I see the different reactions that stone store owners have toward me when I'm in a store touching something and they have towards him. He goes, I can see it firsthand. And so I am so grateful for that. So I need us to figure out more ways to integrate with each other, figure out more ways in your friend circles, why you don't have friends that don't look different from you. Like when you're scrolling through your social media feeds, why aren't there more people of color in your social media feeds because the minute you interact with somebody, you're going to say like, just what you said, Lola, that we all want the same things we want to be heard. We want to be seen. We want to be loved. We want to have opportunities. Um, the same. We want the same opportunities as everybody else. And if you've only surrounded yourself with people who look like you and have the same lived experiences, you you're never going to have the empathy or the understanding of someone else. And that's a sad and sorry, life. In my opinion, I think it's difficult

Speaker 1:

Two for every culture, because two to absorb this pivoting understanding of , of what pivoting is because they're stuck in this space where they're always fighting to either defend themselves or fighting for a space. Um, you know, so I think Lola nailed it when she said once we can learn to accept and love ourselves. And that also comes with forgiveness, right. Forgiveness. Um, then we can maybe eventually come together. Yes, there is hope. There is always hope. Um, and I think this is , um, really more so well in the States where traveling and experiencing other cultures, you know, by traveling, getting out of your own bubble is so important and not traveling like, you know, let's go to somewhere and just go to an all-inclusive and never seen the actual country that you're visiting. I mean, I didn't appreciate it when I was younger, but now looking back, I'm so grateful that I had the chance to grow up in Taiwan and the growing up in the States, different parts of the States, going back to Taiwan, come into Canada for university. And then who knows where we will be next. And this is something that's very important to my husband and I is okay, how are we going to raise Jordi our son so that he can experience the world. So he's not stuck in one little white suburb for the rest of his life, because that is detrimental. Yeah,

Speaker 3:

Yeah. To your it's detrimental to your, your identity , um , your self identity, all of the things that you need to have a broader understanding of the world. And I really love the idea of black lives rising. You've talked to him about black lives, writing , rising, offering opportunities for education. How do , how will black lives rising do that? Like what's your vision around educating people on how to get out of their own circle or under their own bubble?

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I mean, you know, I'm it , this whole movement or initiative or whatever you want to call it, of course started very organically. You know, it started from a pure place of love for my son where I have to do something me as a mom, I have to do something and I'm going to cry when I say that. Cause I always do. But , um, you know, it's, you, you need to figure it out something you can do. That makes sense. Um, and the more we do and the more we put into this work, the less struggle he will have to deal with. So, you know, in Oregon or organically grew from just my passion for that and doing what, doing, doing things. The only way I know how we just grassroots, which is connecting with other people and starting from the community, you know, people think that change has to happen in huge ways from, from the top down. And that, that would be great if that could happen. That would be great. But at the same time, people forget that a lot of the major changes and shifts and transformations happening in society started from the ground up. And we are the ground up, right? Me as a mom, you as a mom, you as a mom, whoever all of us take, you know , placing our stake in that and rising together. Um, for me, I see this education , um, access is the big word, you know, as , as a certified coach, whenever I coach women, people pay me money to , to be coached, to get to their goals. But what if you don't have that money? What have you don't have access? You know, and that's usually one of the biggest barriers to, you know, the marginalized communities rising is because they don't have the same access as other people. So I want to be able to, you know, create something online, obviously because we're such a global village and to be able to have BiPAP voices, BiPAP expertise, be the education pieces that they then can share to be absorbed by the black community. So that a black mom and emerging black leader or parents and kids, they can come to this central space to find the things that they need to empower themselves. Fantastic access access is kind of the, you know , um, the, the core of it all to have access to the things, to help ourselves rise.

Speaker 3:

Yeah . Access is the, is the key, right? That's the thing that's lacking for communities of color is access or in some cases, people call it the seat at the table. So you're creating the table, right?

Speaker 1:

Oh yes, yes. I love that. It's, you know, it's not even like, okay, let's bring a folding chair. If there's not cheer for me at the table, no, we're just creating new tables and we're creating new banquet halls and we're inviting everybody was into this cause , which is equality for humanity and everybody, and love to join us. Right. It's a party.

Speaker 3:

It's definitely a party. And what I found in communities of color in particular is that we tend to want to serve our communities, right. We tend to want to uplift our communities. And when we do that, everyone benefits and we can see a direct correlation of that with what's going on in the United States with the rise of the new administration, because communities of color banded together and said, okay, we've had enough with this white supremacist government. We've had enough with, you know, people out together as we need to do things for our community. And when we do things for our communities together, everyone benefits. It's that old adage that , um, a tide, an incoming tide raises all ships, right? Like it's just, it's not the all or nothing mentality that finite understanding of how PI , if I give you a slice of my pie, that means there is less for me, white supremacy teaches us, or the delusion of white supremacy teaches us in order for some of us to have more others have to have less. And that's not the case at all, equal opportunity and equal access benefits, all of us. And I don't know why people can't understand that lesson. I don't know why people are so afraid that they're losing power when power is infinite, the more power we share, the more power we gain it , you see it all the time. And I just, I don't know what it takes. I , um , well, for me, I've been saying this to my husband for a long time. I've been saying that it is the defining of, of education that has brought us to this place where people don't understand these things.

Speaker 1:

Right. You know, and, and really it's , it's also the dismantling of kind of the masculine energies of competition. Right. Of , of fear of me having to step on your head in order to get a hit . Well, that's not the case. Power is everywhere, but power is everywhere because it it's , it resides within us. Right. Yeah. And that's kind of like that's yeah. Lola, exactly. Like, that's kind of what I was saying a few minutes ago was until we can all individually stop fighting for spaces, realize it is limitless and work on our own self-love . And like you said, just, you know , um , tearing down the teachings and those, those deep rooted things that are there, maybe that's when we'll have a chance.

Speaker 3:

Yes. But the world has to want to change. People have to want to change. People have to want to be educated. People have to want to get out of their own way. And for , uh, for me, I'm kind of at the point where I'm not really interested in reaching out to people who are white supremacists and who are interested in seeing my death, right? Like I'm not interested in bridging the divide or trying to educate them. That's not energy for me that I want to do. I often say my friend, Amber says, that's not my ministry. That's not my ministry. I want to talk to the people who want to do change. Like I want to, because there ha I have to believe there's more of those people than there are of the others. But the other seem to have really loud voices.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. You know, it's , it's funny. I, I want to focus on, of course, you know, the party, right. We focus on our rising so much. We come to our own power, we find our own power within. And when we do that, we help other people rise. And then we're having a great old time over here. And if you would like to join us, we will come. You too , you know, you can come to that conclusion yourself. We don't need to, we're not trying to convince you that this is a good thing, because you will see that it is a good thing in your own time. Right. Um, I think, yeah, it's like, it's that FOMO, right? Like, all I need to worry about is us doing our thing and that grant rising. And when you watch from afar, you're going to be like, you know what? I want to be there too .

Speaker 3:

Um , this is my hope. This is my dream. Wonderful. So is there any final thoughts on this podcast as we come up on the hour? Has there anything else you, you want to share with us?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think it would be so nice if you know, for this black history month for each person who's listening or whose heart is being pulled in this direction of doing something. Um, you know, since, since all the black square posts of blast square on your thing, or all this stuff happened since last summer really take an inventory. What have I actually done between last June to now, right. Take an inventory. And from this point forward, what are three more things I can do this year? That's going to be constructive towards this rising together. You know, and if everybody did three things this year, can you imagine the power? If each of us did three things, constructive, concrete, tangible things. If that could be as simple as like going out to, you know, find a book about Chinese new year because Chinese new year is also coming up, you know, something that gets you out of your own little bubble. If that's where you are for some of us, it may be, you know, for me, I would love to take some sort of like certificate program or something to learn more about diversity inclusion , um , work. I'm not trying to become a professional, but I want to learn more than what I've been doing just from the books. Like, I want something that's a little bit more in between, so that's one option I will be taking. So yeah. Do an inventory of what you've done and list three things that you can tangibly do , uh , for the rest of 2021. And we will be, we will all be in a more powerful place together come 20, 22.

Speaker 3:

I love that. I love that. That gives me pause. That's that's, that's perfect setting. That's like that aligns with what you do D of setting an intention, like set some intentions to take action. I know we sit around and we talk a lot about this and in the yoga community, we would probably say where , you know, we're studying this and we're meditating on this. And we're all of that stuff. I think the time for all of that is now done. We've done enough talking and thinking about it. It's now time to take action. And I, yeah. And we also can't forget that those small things add up to great things. So knowing that the small steps that you make on a daily basis can, can serve us all .

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. I mean, you know, th the critical mass includes any and every action because it's energy, right. We all believe and know the power of that we're energy. And nobody has, nobody's asking you to go out and start a brand new movement or initiative or platform. No, you don't have to do that. I'm very involved because you know, my husband, my son, whatever, and that's my space. You find your space in all of this, and our energies will add up. That's it, it's very simple

Speaker 3:

To grow the Gita, no effort is ever wasted. Yeah , that's right. No effort is so where can people find your work and where can people buy lives? Rising Merck . Whenever I wear my black lives writing rising , t-shirt I, I have a link in my bio to buy your merge , but where else can they find your merge ?

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So yeah, this all actually started with, I, you know what, I'm just going to create a shirt. And so I'm actually wearing the prototype that I did on Canva , where you can just design something and then, you know , kind of then turn it into what it is now. So , um, you know, there goes the small action multiplying , uh, w we are black lives, rising.com is where you can get all the merge . And it's simple as just adding to that energy, adding to that positive rising collective , um, of course on Instagram, black lives rising. Uh , and then of course, we're on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, all the wonderful social media spheres, but yes, to , uh , get a shirt or a hoodie or to , uh, the website is we, our black lives rising.com.

Speaker 3:

Wonderful, perfect. Your merge really supports the movement. So that can be your one actionable. One of your three actionable steps is to support people who are doing the work. So if you're out there and you're like, I don't know what I should do. Um, after you've taken inventory, you can always support organizations that are already doing the work. You can support your local chapter of black lives matter. Uh, you can start following and supporting the work of black creators on social media. You can go to the black lives rising. We are black lives, rising website, and check out what's going on with that. There's lots of ways that you can take small ripple effects to make the world a better place for all of us. Uh, DNI on , on behalf of DNI would like to thank Lola for being on the podcast today and for launching , uh , black history month in such a positive and powerful way. Thank you, Lola, for your insights, your excellence and your activism. We're grateful to have you in our community.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much, everybody for this time and space and energy and love. We are all in this together in love. Thank you, Lola. We appreciate you. Hey everybody. Thank you so much for listening. We absolutely loved talking to Lola from black lives, rising and finding out how we can support and aluminate and create a platform for black lives to rise. You can find Lola at we are black lives , rising.com, and you can support the work by purchasing her merchandise at we are black lives rising. You can reach me at Dianne. Bondy yoga official on Instagram and on Facebook and on Twitter and on Tik TOK. And you can reach di at Yogi D on Instagram, as well as@divineintentions.com. Please subscribe to the podcast, leave a comment because it really, really helps. Thank you so much for being here and we'll see you next time.