Two Black Girls Talk About Everything

Episode 3 Teaching Yoga as Black Women

January 24, 2021 Dianne Bondy Yoga Season 1 Episode 3
Two Black Girls Talk About Everything
Episode 3 Teaching Yoga as Black Women
Show Notes Transcript

This episode  Dee and I  share what it's like to teach yoga as black women and how we use our yoga to navigate racism, privilege, and the wellness world. 

Speaker 1:

[inaudible] two black girls talking about everything, podcasts. I'm Diane and I ID . And we're going to be talking about every bill talking about yoga and passion and just everything black girls talk about you . So we're here to share our conversation with you.

Speaker 2:

Hey, welcome back. Emphasized Haiti. Hi Dan, how are you? How are you? I haven't seen you in awhile. What? You've been up to what you were talking about? Who are you going on? Christmas holidays. Divine intentions is crazy. Wow . Yeah. Cool. A day. Lucky . So yeah, we're taping this podcast prior to the holidays. We had a lot going on. Dee's got her jewelry going on. I've been doing a lot of stuff behind the scenes to launch some cool stuff coming up in January, but we thought we take a pause. And in our last podcast, we talked about some of our favorite podcasts and the number one favorite podcasts that we have is the yoga instead podcast . Yes . And I onboarded on that podcast pretty quickly on, and they are doing a series called the , or have done a series called the afterlife. And I moderated that very first podcast. So you can see me. You can hear me talking to angel and Jay cell on the yoga's day podcast. We're moderating the very first one where they talked about who killed yoga and they talked about white women killed yoga. And I knew that they were going to get a lot of pushback. So of course, pretty heavy . Yeah . Yeah. I mean, it's a bold statement. It's not an untrue statement, but I mean, they qualify the statement. So if you listen to the podcast, we talk about how the dominant culture has affected people of colors, either entry into yoga, their perception of yoga, how they're treated in yoga and they share their lived experience. And so on the afterlife, they're kind of reviewing what's going on right afterward. And Dee had said to me, did you see the, the message that they Joel had put up on her Instagram? Now we are way past when she put this up, she put this up back in November and she was talking about how the backlash was from the dominant culture that we should not be talking about when we are marginalized on the yoga mat and we stay silent. And like she said, was to put a smile on your face and just move along. Yeah. That people are having a bad day and we should just be quiet when we are continued to be marginalized. And that she was concerned when she goes back to her community in Michigan, that she's not going to be welcomed in spaces because she is articulating or speaking truth to power of the experience of being a woman of color. And let's be clear. I , South Asian woman of color whose culture , this is speaking about how she's been treated on the yoga mat. Some of assumptions people make about yoga. Some of the appropriation that happens in yoga and that, you know, we just assume people are having a bad day and ignore that. You know why I'm going to say it. It's going to get me backlash, but I'm just going to say, it sounds like a lot of white women, white people, wellness, whining, like if you are encouraged to look at your own bias and how you show up in the world and how that affects others, we've already been quiet for too long, right ? People of color have already put a smile on her face and put up with it and try really hard or have been trained by the dominant culture to, you know , not upset the dominant culture, but how are you ever going to grow or learn if we don't learn, or if you're not told, if you're not made aware of your impact,

Speaker 3:

Talked about that in the last podcast as well. Um, and you know, I messaged her or commented on her post , um, after I listened to it and I told her that you have to continue speaking your truth. And just because somebody tells you about their experience and you don't agree with it, it doesn't mean they didn't experience that. That was not their experience with something. Um, and sometimes we all know from personal experiences that when it is we are triggered or something hits a nerve, there is a reason behind that. And it doesn't always necessarily have to do with the person that we are backlashing at. Absolutely. Right. So it's our job to take personal responsibility and figure out why is that bothering you?

Speaker 2:

Um , and that's, that's hard work, right? And the last podcast, I said, growth continues. I don't know if you remembered, but at the end we were talking about pet peeves and I forgot to ask Dee about her pet peeve. And then I made the joke cause it's always me. Cause sometimes it is like, can be, I'm a little self focused. I'm not, I don't judge you. I appreciate that. She's my sister. Um, but it was really interesting to me when you get in your feelings about something, what is that about? That's my self-study , that's my sweaty, a high end . The minute I have, that's a visceral reaction to something. The first thing that I say to myself as like, Whoa, what's the issue with me? Yeah . Whoa, what is this about? Why do I feel this way? Why am I getting upset? Why am I, you know, triggered? And I get triggered a lot. And I think I even said in the last podcast look out like as part of my pet peeve, if I get triggered, all my kindness, all my sympathy, all my empathy might go out the window because I'm really hurting that moment. And I have to, in some way, protect myself. Like I ha I told a story in teacher a few years ago where I was coming out of Casada , which is our , uh , version of Chipotle here in Canada. I don't know if it's, I think it's a Canadian franchise. I don't know if they have it in the States. Cause it's like Chipotle. It's like the same thing as poli . And so I was coming out Tripoli with my burrito bowl and I was walking to my car and this woman was telling a joke. She was getting into her car in front of shoppers drug Mart, which is our CVA . Your CVS. If you're listening in America was telling a joke to her partner and saying, what do you call a black person? As I was walking by? And I was like, Whoa, what do you call a black person? And I go, no, finish the joke. And that's what I say . Cause I was really mad. And then she said the joke and he laughed and they both looked at me and then I threw my burrito at their windshield, which was not smart. Cause I paid for that burrito and I wanted to eat that burrito. But then I turned around and I said, something really horrible back. I won't repeat it. Cause it was just terrible. What I said, Matt . And then I beat myself up for a week about it because I wasn't being yoga in the moment, but I can't let people tell racist jokes and just assume, well they know no better. And I'll give them a pass because me not saying something allows that behavior to continue, allows them to get away with something it's clear. They didn't see me walking up because when I startled her, when she turned to look at me and Chad had the nerve to say, Oh, I'm sorry, you're not sorry. Or you win the Senate in the first place. And then for him to laugh and look at me and then some other white dude came out a shopper's drug Mart and snickered at me. So right there, I had three microaggressions from the dominant culture. And I'm just to assume that they're having a bad day or that they don't know better. So I have to be compassionate to them

Speaker 3:

Type of behavior and those telling those jokes, didn't start at that second. No, it didn't start at these behaviors. Don't start that day. Right. So it's not a bad day. It's like a bad life. Exactly. So , um, yeah, that's kinda how I look at it. It's like, it's like having a child,

Speaker 2:

Right? Yeah ,

Speaker 3:

Yeah. You know, behaviors or whatever things that they learn, learn, they learn them.

Speaker 2:

And they've learned them from a long time ago. These ideas had been set. And so I didn't bother going back to Cassata cause I'm not gonna pay another, you know, I don't know how much I paid for my brain , but whatever. But I threw that burrito on the windshield, their car. And then I fully expected to have like a police situation. But then I got in my car and like drove off. But I just thought to myself really, and people are supposed to just be quiet. There are a lot of microaggressions and a lot of abuse that happens in yoga.

Speaker 3:

And um, now that we have the me too movement,

Speaker 2:

That's been around and we've seen what's happened with Harvey Weinstein and we've seen women speak up about things. We've been silent about forever. There's going back now. And if people are having a bad day and that, and we're supposed to give them compassion and this is supposed to be, I himsa , I think it's not a hipster to yourself because you have been hurt and people need to know, and it's not. It's it's violence against the person that you're not enlightening about. The behavior that is problematic. That will continue to be problematic within the culture and create uncomfortable situations for everybody. Like we, as people of color have been uncomfortable for a long time in making the dominant culture feel comfortable about their sexism, about their racism, about the way they treat people. And what's interesting. This makes me think of a conversation we had when we were running in the summertime. You as a person who is of a lighter complexion, who has light-skinned privilege, meaning you can be in spaces. And sometimes you're racially ambiguous. When I see you, I see a black girl, but we are looking for each other. We can feel each other. Right. But other times you're in spaces where people don't know who you are or mistake you for weight . That's right. And the things that you must do .

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah. I was telling you

Speaker 2:

Your whole life. And it's funny because I actually experienced it all. And I've thought about it so much when my hair was shorter Villa with the Corolla,

Speaker 3:

Like sport, a Halle Berry short [inaudible] . And so my hair actually looks straight then the lighter complexion, right? Oh yeah. Later, later eyes and yeah , people would let loose. They would let loose. Right. Then say things that, because I was falling under the radar. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Racism. Right. You were white passing and people didn't know. And so if that is happening to D is she supposed to say nothing because it makes people feel uncomfortable. It makes dominant culture feel uncomfortable. This to me, smacks of what we're seeing going on in the U S with the rise of, I would, I'm going to call it Trumpism where somehow people speaking up about injustices that have been happening to them is somehow an injustice to the person who's perpetuating it. You are not oppressed by being told that your behavior is problematic. You are not being oppressed. When I don't care. If you're having a bad day, if you've done something that is horrible and needs to be brought to your attention, it needs to be brought to your attention. It needs to be called out. It needs to be called out.

Speaker 3:

It's time. You either you think twice about it. Yeah. You're more mindful. You're more mindful. You think twice about it. And if you decide to do it again, then that's all you.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. This is a problem. This is problematic. Right? You are technically what, what Faisal is saying is you're asking people to spiritual bypass, loving life, loving life, loving life. My thoughts and blogs , love and light in whose favor. Right? Love and light and no action. Because another word that we use in yoga is called karma and karma literally is the definition of karma is action. What action are you taking to make spaces more equitable and more inclusive? What actions are you taking instead of being in your feelings about being called out about problematic behavior, what action are you taking to actually change that behavior? Are you, are you I'm getting in my feelings out . So yoga is about liberation, right? Yoga is about liberation and liberating yourself from bad behaviors that create problems in the community is what we're looking at. And we want to liberate spaces so that people feel safe and things feel equitable and all bodies can show up. And not only on yoga mats, because that's a microcosm of the larger world, but in the larger world and asking people of color to be silent on experiences that they're having is oppression. It's not liberation. And if your feelings are hurt, because you're called out on bad behavior, that is sexist, racist , um , homophobic ages . I got called out for being a , just a couple of weeks ago. And I didn't even realize I was doing it. And I was horrified, absolutely horrified. And so I want people to not be quiet about things. I don't want people not to call me out when I've done something that's a hundred percent. I want to know. Yes. And if you don't want to know your feelings are hurt that on you. Yeah . That's it like, there's a reason. There's a reason. There's a reason. Why is why is the burden all was on people of color to make white folks feel better about themselves? Why is that our job , our job? Like, I just don't understand why we can't acknowledge white supremacy. Why we can't acknowledge bad behavior, especially in yoga. When we're talking about things that are supposed to bring unity and connection. If you don't know you're hurting somebody, then we can't be unified or connected. That's right. We can't be, we can't be. Yeah . You need to know so that when you're stepping forward and you're, and you're showing up on the mat, you're not perpetuating harm, which is the violence, the violence that was so hard to hear her talk about . No, I was shocked when I , um, when I heard that. So I knew when that podcast came out, that they were going to go so much. When I, when I, I mean, within the first five minutes of the podcast , I subscribed to it. I went on their patriotic , how can I give you money subscribe ? And it was like all the things . Um , and it's not as though they're just making these accusations, they've got solid there's visits . Yes. There's some times what they are saying, you know, it's not just a bunch of, you know , uh, yeah. I mean, they've done their research. Yeah . That lived there. This was their , like you said, their lived experience. So even if you don't agree with it, it does not mean that it's not their experience and that it's not, not true. And it's not valid. Absolutely. A hundred percent. So at the time the podcast first aired, I was teaching a 200 hour teacher training and I made them listen to it. And my whole teacher training were white folks. I was talking about it in my teacher training. Yes. I found it. And I think everybody should talk about it. I spoke to your teacher trainer and I said, what was your overall reaction? And she said, everybody in my teacher training really embraced it and understood where people were coming from and were really supportive of it. And I didn't have a similar experience, which I find shocking because I'm pretty transparent about who I am. If you go on my Instagram, on my social media, if you talk to me, if you follow anything that I do, I'm always talking about race and equity and culture and diversity and accessible spaces. I am always and have always been talking about this, the very first podcast, that lot , or the very first article, I should say, blog posts that launched me into activism that made me call myself an accidental activist was yoga. Isn't just for skinny white girls, which was a blog post I read . I had written in 2012 for elephant journal. And it talked about my experience as a black person in white yoga spaces and white women's wellness spaces. And it was amazing to me. It went viral in about 15 minutes. I just remember getting these emails saying, it's hit this many views. It's hit this many reads . And if you go back to it now on elephant journal, I think it has something like 2,500 comments. And the majority of those comments are people who are feeling the exact same way as I was feeling in that moment. Those are the things that made the yoga industry change. Those are the reasons why you see people like my friend, Amber Karnes, who was on the cover of yoga journal this month showing a plus sized body because people spoke up and people made noise. And people said, we are tired of seeing one homogeneous image of yoga for buffer . For the longest time. When , when you'd look at yoga journal, you would only see, you would see the same picture all the time with just to dif a different person with different color hair in a different outfit. If you go through a lined up all the , the front covers of those issues, you couldn't tell one from the next right. Well, I mean, I seen it in , uh, in the fitness industry. Exactly . I mean, not even like yoga as well as industry. I remember being a young girl is when I started to getting into weightlifting and wanting to compete and just seeing the same

Speaker 3:

All the time, all the time, cover, flip through the pages. I was like, I swear, it was like the same person.

Speaker 2:

They were interchangeable. That's right . Interchangeable. So we speak up about this stuff. And then we see things. Then we start to see people, like I said, like Amber, on the cover we saw , um , we saw somebody who was an amputee and a man on the cover we saw in the running magazine back in, I think 2012 or 2014 Mira Valario who is an ultra marathoner. Who's in a plus sized body was on the cover of running magazine. Things need when the only way that we make change and make spaces more equitable and alleviate oppression is that we speak truth to power. Right? And if you have any empower and your feelings happen to get hurt that on you go back to your community and talk about what it is that upsets you and thinking

Speaker 3:

Of the people, voicing what they believe to stroke the ego.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. Or to be silent.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And just not say anything and allow it to continue happening.

Speaker 2:

That's violence. And I don't think we're practicing yoga. If we're doing those things, we're not giving people a clear pass the liberation . I'm going to liberate you from your bias. I'm going to liberate you from your small minded . This I'm going to liberate you from your lack of awareness. I'm going to liberate you from hurting other people. By letting you know, these are the things we're experiencing, as people who are constantly other, whether you're a person of size, whether you're a person of color, whether you're a person who lives with a disability, whether you are a person of an interesting age, there's lots of ways where we are othered in the world. And we're supposed to just be quiet about it. That makes no sense to me . It doesn't. It makes no sense. And it's boring. Totally.

Speaker 3:

You didn't want to see these things. It'd be so boring. Aren't we tired of the same thing over and over and yeah ,

Speaker 2:

Over again. And I just think diversity I've said this a lot. I don't know where I've heard this before, but diversity is the spice of life. Diversity of thought, diversity of perspective, diversity of skin, color, diversity of culture, all of those things are so interesting. So I had gone into Tik TOK. Cause you were in tick-tock and you were posting all these videos. I'm like, what is this thing? Like, what is she doing? And so I stumbled across no , but you were like yoga stuff and sequences and all kinds of stuff. I'm not dancing. I want to, but I can't was like, now we're going to go laugh. But I, this morning, all day trying to get it down, get it down. My son's really good at it at like CR like editing the video. I don't even know how to do that, but I I'm so sad as a black woman, as a black girl, I didn't get the double Dutch gene and I didn't get the torque Jean . So this morning, did you get the [inaudible] I'm working on it because I found a YouTube video on how to twerk . I don't do much back. None of booty for me. I just, I put too much back in it. So I'm going to work it out and I'm figuring it out. But I watched a torquing video today and I don't know why I got on this topic, but I looked, I looked up a torquing video just because I want to learn how to work properly. And I just figured I'm West Indian. I'm pretty sure we graded that whole thing. Every carnival, every prop over every cabana, people are twerking . We never used a college working twerking. It got the name working maybe in the last 10 years or so, but we were always doing it. What did we call it? We probably, well, it doesn't look the same as Lizzo. And that's what I want to look like. I want to know . I love you . Love you all . We need you to talk, but yeah, I know. I know right there. Write down her name, put it down, put it down. It'll happen. Listen , we're writing you down. We want to honor honor intention, intentional list of people we want to talk to. We want to talk to Liz that's when you put it down, it's going to happen. It's going to happen. I put it in writing pen and pen to paper, but that was our little sidetrack, but coming back around, but yoga is about liberation and being quiet, never liberated anybody. And one of those great, like I dunno , cliches that we hear , uh , well well-behaved women rarely make history. So true. So, you know, the yoga is a podcast. Women are going to make history in influencing the culture and changing the culture to allow all of us to feel like we belong, to feel like we're part of this. And to make people more aware, it is our job or our Dharma or divine calling as yoga teachers to help shape and shift consciousness. And you cannot do that by being quiet. Could you imagine it back in the sixties, black folks just decided we're not going to bother with the civil rights movement. Yeah . Just , just keep on doing. We're going to just keep on living in Jim Crow because we don't want to hurt anybody's feelings sitting at the back of the bus. Yes. And not being at the, at the lunch counter or they were silent and didn't leave. You. Wouldn't be here. If your family didn't get angry and didn't rise up, your family wouldn't have come here. You wouldn't be a sixth generation Canadian as a black person that wouldn't have happened. We wouldn't have any of the things that we have now. Women wouldn't have had the right to vote. If women were just quiet because men were having a bad day, women wouldn't have had the right to vote schools. Wouldn't be integrated. Women's rights. Wouldn't happen. The me too movement wouldn't happen. Well, he's having a bad day. And that's why he went after . You have to just be quiet, just be quiet violence to the workplace by complaining that you're being harassed or that we're creating a hostile environment for people to work in. What is this? Again? This sounds like a lot of white people whining, not all white people, but the people who are pushing back against this .

Speaker 3:

Yeah. That actually have the nerve to say anything.

Speaker 2:

And that's the stuff that's emboldened by racism. That's the stuff that's emboldened by white supremacy. I'm sure we're going to get comments on this podcast. And I'm okay with that too. I'm not , I'm not, I'm not here to,

Speaker 3:

Like I said, stroke, anybody's ego. No,

Speaker 2:

I'm not here to be respectable. I'm not here to be likable. I'm here to make you think about yourself. I'm here to make change. So I don't have to worry about my kid in the world.

Speaker 3:

And we're here to speak our truth and to talk about the things that we want to talk about. Absolutely . Our personal experiences are

Speaker 2:

Our podcast and not yours, yours, and yeah,

Speaker 3:

I'm speaking to the people that have felt the same way as myself or Diane that's who we're relating to. So if you don't like it, I'd subscribe . Yeah.

Speaker 2:

It's my feelings won't be hurt. None . I know we have to give a voice to the people who feel voiceless. Right? And my side thought on Tik TOK was the whole twerking and dancing thing is I have learned more about indigenous culture on Tik TOK. I stumbled across indigenous tick talk and it is forever educating me on things I had no idea about. And I'm really sad about it because I'm a Canadian that didn't learn this in school. I think my kids are learning it now, but I follow indigenous creators. I follow LGBTQ plus creators. I follow everybody and anybody because I really want to learn more about this experience, right? And it's been an incredible thing to be open to the possibility of hearing somebody else's perspective and somebody else's lived experience. It makes me a more full human. It makes me a more empathetic human. If my feelings are getting hurt over stuff, it's an opportunity for me to learn a filler .

Speaker 3:

It means I'm still learning room for self-growth .

Speaker 2:

Oh, my yoga teacher says all this all the time, Dr. Gail Parker, this is a shadow to you. Growth continues. And if we stop growing and stop learning, what happens? What is that a symptom of what happens to things that stop growing? They die. They die. So I'm very sad about this. I can't, I was really bothered by this. I haven't been on the ground much today, or if I haven't been pretty self-centered I haven't really scrolled, but I'm very sad that this is what it's come to. That the yoga community is trying to silence the voices of people who feel othered or people who are pushed in the margins of this practice. Right? Cause it's only really recently that we've been seeing images other than thin white able-bodied young women doing yoga. It's this is a very recent phenomenon that we're seeing more diversity that we're hearing about , uh , yoga teachers , um, doing things that they shouldn't be doing, touching students that they, that, you know, in ways that are inappropriate, all of this stuff has been kept silent for so long. And now that we're bringing that light to the surface, you want us to be quiet?

Speaker 3:

We got a lot of time. We've got a lot of time

Speaker 2:

To make up for. Absolutely. So I guess stop, sit down, be quiet, be quiet and listen and listen, listen, listen. When people tell you this has happened to them , it's not for you to say it hasn't or we're creating violence. It's for you to listen and go, wow. I had no idea that this is happening in the world and I want to be a part of the change. The question is, where do you want to be? When history is written, where do you want to be? On what side of history do you want to be? I watched , um, her name is Ruby. Uh , I'm forgetting her last name. She was a president. Lyndon Johnson sent the national guard to walk her to school, Ruby, Ruby bridges. Right? So I , for a long time, when Kamala Harris , uh, you know, when she ascended to vice-president like Kamala Harris, there was a picture floating around Instagram of Kamala Harris walking and the shadow of her walking was Ruby bridges. Right? And I went back and watched the video on YouTube of the governor of, I want to say Georgia standing , uh , correct me if I'm wrong. They're standing in the doorway and resisting having Ruby come into class. And the two to 400 people, angry people, angry white folks showing up to attack a five-year-old little girl for wanting to go to school. And these people were bringing a likeness of Ruby in a coffin and showing it and telling them that they were going to kill a five-year-old child for going to school. I watched the vitriol of those people, screaming at that little girl. Okay . A lot of those people are still alive today, including Ruby bridges , who you can go on YouTube and look her up and she will speak. She's recently spoken to that experience. A lot of those people are still alive. How do you feel seeing that now? Are you proud of yourself? Now? When we look back on that in history, you see yourself screaming at a five year old girl, a little girl who all she wants to do is go to school at school. Like everybody else, should we be, should we have been quiet about that? People having a bad day or a bad life, we are allowing them to

Speaker 3:

You do that. My father and Diane , my father went to a segregated school in Essex County until he was in grade five. He is 63 years.

Speaker 2:

Exactly. So everybody was aware of that. People are still alive. This is not a loss.

Speaker 3:

So then when I say we got a lot of time to make up for,

Speaker 2:

We do, we do. That's not that long ago. That is not that long ago. I am 50 years old. And I remember back to when it was okay to call people names and there was nothing you could do about it. Yeah . It was okay for people to bully me. And there was nothing I could do about it. And my parents would teach me sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt me that a lie. And we know it, that other stuff, chips away at your soul. And I'm really, really discouraged and sad that people are telling us that we need to be compliant . If we had felt empowered enough to speak up earlier, maybe things would have been different. I would hope so . Right. Right. I'm really interested to see when we write history 50 years from now about this time before your blip. Yep . What will, what will it say? Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Well, it'd be bias stuff.

Speaker 2:

I am wondering that 71% of Americans who voted to continue the living nightmare, that has been the Trump regime for the past four years. When they write about you and history, how will you be perceived when they write about you supporting fascism? When they write about this cult of personality

Speaker 3:

Guys, like it's not just like something it's not , it's obviously it is a thing we just witnessed it. What? Three weeks ago?

Speaker 2:

10 years ago, just going on

Speaker 3:

Thing . Yeah. Because if it wasn't, we wouldn't be talking about it. We wouldn't be talking about it. And , uh , it would have been done by like midnight that night,

Speaker 2:

That night or because of COVID they had to do the male allies, at least what they voted on a Tuesday by Friday, it would have been wrapped . Let's be honest by Friday . We now mailing boats. I forgot about those . Yeah. Well , yeah, but at least by the end of the week, right. And at least by the end of the week, but this is what I'm saying without the mail and boats , it should have been done . And over the, you know, we're all exhausted and we're all emotional and we're all having a bad day, but that doesn't excuse our bad behavior. It really doesn't. And that doesn't give us the right to ask other people to be quiet because our feelings are hurt. It doesn't give us the right. That is the ultimate and white privilege to us to ask a person of color, not to speak to their experience . Yeah. That is the option . Just keep smiling. Yeah. That is somehow, you know, it's a himself to do that, that spiritual bypassing. And I'll let you know you're not practicing yoga. No. And I think maybe you should find another modality if that's how you feel, you know what good does some good self development books. There you go over to , if you want to, one of my personal development and tension setting classes, we can start working on that. Exactly. Because this is not fair and it isn't right. And I want the yoga is dead podcast. Yes. Women, [inaudible] it ? Uh , we're here for you , sister . You love you guys. We do the two , two black girls talking about everything. We're talking about you today and we are all about it and we're a hundred percent here for it. So on that happy note, we are going to leave. You stay tuned. So D yes, Diane. Have we talked about everything? I think we've talked about everything. Thanks for joining us. Thank you guys. And always let us know if there's anybody you want us to interview, or if you want to be on the podcast, we'd love to talk to you. Please check us out on our social media handles. I am Diane . Bondy yoga official on Instagram and Tik TOK and Facebook. And I am Yogi underscore D underscore on Instagram, or you can follow me at divine intentions. D E V I N E intentions also on Instagram. Thanks everybody. We'll talk to you soon. Peace.